To Kill A Mockingbird

To Kill A Mockingbird

eBook - 2014
Average Rating:
Rate this:
262
35
33
 …
Harper Lee's Pulitzer prize-winning masterwork of honor and injustice in the deep south—and the heroism of one man in the face of blind and violent hatred, available now for the first time as an e-book. One of the best-loved stories of all time, To Kill a Mockingbird has been translated into more than forty languages, sold more than thirty million copies worldwide, served as the basis for an enormously popular motion picture, and was voted one of the best novels of the twentieth century by librarians across the country. A gripping, heart-wrenching, and wholly remarkable tale of coming-of-age in a South poisoned by virulent prejudice, it views a world of great beauty and savage inequities through the eyes of a young girl, as her father-a crusading local lawyer-risks everything to defend a black man unjustly accused of a terrible crime.
Publisher: [S.l.]: HarperCollins, 2014.
ISBN: 9780062368683
Branch Call Number: eBook
Characteristics: 336 p.
Additional Contributors: 3M Company

Opinion

From Library Staff

Atticus is a measure of humanity.


From the critics


Community Activity

Comment

Add a Comment
c
ctonci
Jul 01, 2020

To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee is a beautiful story about a young girl, Scout Finch, navigating a racist and sexist world. Her father, an esteemed lawyer takes on a case of an innocent black man that was to be executed. Scout starts to see the subtle hate against her family grow for supporting a black man in a racist world. Also as the trial continues, Scout and her brother Jem have many adventures, some with strong sexist and racist undertones, teaching the reader how women and people of color are treated in those times. Other adventures are instead lighthearted and amusing. I would rate this book a 5 out of 5 since it stays interesting and lively while teaching the reader about very heavy and dark subjects. This book was an easy read because the author’s style allows the reader to follow the story easily and pick up on the specific nuances of the plot. I would recommend this book to 12+ readers interested in coming of age/fiction books since the book is easy to follow along but some of the vocabulary is too complex for younger readers and follows a young girl into adulthood.

g
gurjassingh
Jun 14, 2020

To Kill A Mockingbird describes the life of a young Southern girl during the 1930s. Scout Finch’s life turns upside down when her lawyer father takes on a case to defend an innocent black man in court. Only six years old, Scout is forced to grow up as she is thrown into the real world of racial injustice and prejudice. Her small town reveals its true colors as she is punished for her father’s work. Scout’s naïve innocence at the beginning of the novel, symbolically expressed as the mockingbird, is poisoned by the racist society set in its ways. Her struggle to understand humanity’s good and evil is beautifully described by Lee who grew up in a similar environment. The symbolism and metaphorical writing truly convey a superficial society ruining everything good and innocent it touches. This novel has multiple layers of meaning to analyze, each metaphor more enjoyable than the last.

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Jun 11, 2020

When You begin reading To Kill A Mockingbird it’s a little confusing but once you get to the second chapter it begins to make sense. Anyhow, To Kill A Mockingbird is a timeless classic for the fact it tackles with the theme of racism through the eyes of a child. Personally, I don’t think there could have been a better way to tell it since children have innocent eyes and I strongly believe we should too. Be warned that some parts are tear jerkers and most scenes in the book might make you very angry as a black man named Tom Robinson is treated so unfairly. I recommend that everyone should read this since it teaches us about racism and as a matter of fact the school curriculum has changed so that you must read it but if you haven’t yet you definitely should, it makes for great summer reading. 3 stars
@Celine of the Hamilton Public Library's Teen Review Board

t
TEENREVIEWBOARD
Jun 05, 2020

To Kill a Mocking Bird is definitely a famous classic for many reasons. No matter how many times you read this book, it never really fails to have the same effect it always does. This book is so mind-opening and gives people so much to think about. There are so many different and important morals and messages in this story that makes it perfect for anyone in anytime. Despite the fact that it is an old book, it holds meaning to our present-day and I believe it will continue to hold its strong morals throughout many years in the future. Although there are many messages, the big picture in the book is to be brave and do the right thing, even in the worst situations. 5 stars
@avacadojai of the Hamilton Public Library Teen Review Board

m
maheswari_bajji
May 25, 2020

To Kill a Mockingbird is a book written by Harper Lee. It is about a young girl named
Scout Fitch who talks about her childhood at Maycomb Alabama in the 1930s. Her father Atticus is a lawyer who has to prove an African man innocent, even though he knows that whatever he
does won’t save the African man since this story occurs in the 1930s when people were
discriminated against. Throughout the story Scout learns a lot about her father and her
surroundings. Other than the story of her father, Scout also talks about a man Boo Radley who
is known to be kind of strange. They try to meet him due to the scary rumors they hear about
him. I like this story as it talks about a young girl living in the Age of Depression with a father
who is working hard to make everyone equal. This story teaches us about life and death and is
a glimpse of the past.

o
onepandella
Apr 18, 2020

This follow Scout Finch's life in the Deep South as an 8 year old white girl who's the daughter of Atticus Finch, the defendant for a black man's trial.

4/5: The writing style is very interesting. It has a lot of nuance and can imply a lot of different things in a few words. I like it. I also like the ending. I read this book in 6th grade on my own (I wanted to seem smart) but I barely remember anything. This book though is packed with themes of racism, justice, femininity, etc. Overall I enjoyed it. I thought the ending would be depressing, but it ended on a happier note, which made me like this book a lot more.

What I Take Away: Don't kill mockingbird. All they do is sing. Why kill something that only sings and brings joy?

f
fred98115
Mar 21, 2020

Scout Finch's father, Atticus, is assigned to be the lawyer defending a young black man accused of raping a white girl. He seems innocent but is convicted by a jury of the girl's peers. All of this is a lesson in morality for his young daughter. Further, she is attacked but saved by a reclusive neighbor, prompting a comparison to mockingbirds, mostly unseen songsters that should remain alive.

a
anne1212li
Mar 16, 2020

To Kill a Mockingbird is a brilliant book filled with themes such as racism, good vs. evil, and social inequality. It shows what life was like for African Americans during the 1960s through, not a victim's eyes, but a witness. Harper has made readers captivated and hooked as the lines blur for Scout, Dill, and Jem. It's a wonderful yet controversial book that proves different views and outlooks.

r
red_penguin_917
Mar 12, 2020

Fantastic book. Book has a lot of relevant topics and truly keeps the reader interested throughout the book.

c
CCrumley60
Mar 07, 2020

Read Feb 2020. A good read.

View All Comments

Age

Add Age Suitability
g
gurjassingh
Jun 14, 2020

gurjassingh thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

m
maheswari_bajji
May 25, 2020

maheswari_bajji thinks this title is suitable for 14 years and over

FriendsDragonsCats44 thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

nUmBeR_1_fAn_Of_FoOd thinks this title is suitable for 13 years and over

r
rabios
Apr 27, 2019

rabios thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

j
jmli
Dec 08, 2017

jmli thinks this title is suitable for 12 years and over

g
green_rabbit_444
Jun 09, 2017

green_rabbit_444 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 14 and 99

r
red_jaguar_905
Apr 05, 2017

red_jaguar_905 thinks this title is suitable for 10 years and over

v
violet_dog_8583
Dec 29, 2016

violet_dog_8583 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 8 and 99

i
indigo_horse_157
Dec 16, 2016

indigo_horse_157 thinks this title is suitable for between the ages of 9 and 76

View All Ages

Quotes

Add a Quote
a
ambdizzle
Aug 23, 2019

They did the best they could with the sense they had.

s
sonu_n
Feb 26, 2019

“Atticus said to Jem one day, "I’d rather you shot at tin cans in the backyard, but I know you’ll go after birds. Shoot all the blue jays you want, if you can hit ‘em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." That was the only time I ever heard Atticus say it was a sin to do something, and I asked Miss Maudie about it. "Your father’s right," she said. "Mockingbirds don’t do one thing except make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corn cribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.”

j
jmli
Dec 08, 2017

"Will you take me home?" - Boo Radley

k
Kadiamum
Jul 22, 2016

"You never really understand a person until you consider things from his point of view... until you climb into his skin and walk around in it" - Atticus Finch

j
JM8
Jun 22, 2016

"People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for."

j
jeremiah_5
Jun 22, 2016

This case is as simple as black and white

f
FandomQueen
Jan 09, 2016

“People in their right minds never take pride in their talents.”

r
Reeana
Jul 08, 2015

“Atticus told me to delete the adjectives and I'd have the facts.”

r
Reeana
Jul 08, 2015

“People generally see what they look for, and hear what they listen for.”

r
Reeana
Jul 08, 2015

“Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.”

View All Quotes

Notices

Add Notices
g
green_rabbit_444
Jun 09, 2017

Sexual Content: To Kill a Mocking bird's main story line is a court case over an alleged rape.

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Frightening or Intense Scenes: A few dark scenes (including the trial and the conclusion of the book).

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Violence: Depictions of murder, killings, and such. Lots of childhood fights in the schoolyard and the like.

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Coarse Language: Lots of coarse language, including racial slurs.

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Sexual Content: Outright mentions of rape, as well as implications of incest.

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Frightening or Intense Scenes: A few dark scenes (including the trial and the conclusion of the book).

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Coarse Language: Lots of coarse language, including racial slurs.

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Sexual Content: Outright mentions of rape, as well as implications of incest.

b
britprincess1
Jul 21, 2012

Violence: Depictions of murder, killings, and such. Lots of childhood fights in the schoolyard and the like.

Rinve Jul 17, 2012

Sexual Content: Tom supposedly raping a women( I kind of forgot the name)

View All Notices

Summary

Add a Summary
olive_bird_01 Jun 13, 2015

Scout Finch (Mary Badham), 6,and her older brother, Jem (Phillip Alford), live in sleepy Maycomb, Ala., spending much of their time with their friend Dill (John Megna) and spying on their reclusive and mysterious neighbor, Boo Radley (Robert Duvall). When Atticus (Gregory Peck), their widowed father and a respected lawyer, defends a black man named Tom Robinson (Brock Peters) against fabricated rape charges, the trial and tangent events expose the children to evils of racism and stereotyping.

olive_bird_01 Jun 13, 2015

Scout Finch (Mary Badham), 6,and her older brother, Jem (Phillip Alford), live in sleepy Maycomb, Ala., spending much of their time with their friend Dill (John Megna) and spying on their reclusive and mysterious neighbor, Boo Radley (Robert Duvall). When Atticus (Gregory Peck), their widowed father and a respected lawyer, defends a black man named Tom Robinson (Brock Peters) against fabricated rape charges, the trial and tangent events expose the children to evils of racism and stereotyping.

r
riddhi_blue_16
Jun 25, 2014

Jem and Scout who live in Maycomb, Alabama with their father Atticus Finch.
Atticus Finch is a lawyer and he is defending Tom Robinson who is accused of raping Mayella Ewell. Mayella's dad Bob Ewell is a very cruel man who beats up Mayella and blames everything on Tom. Boo Radley in Jem and Scout's neighbor. Everyone thinks Boo killed his own father. One night Jem and Scout were on their way home and were attacked by Bob Ewell and Bob tried to kill Jem and Scout. But Boo Radley saved them by killing Bob Ewell.
Now as Scout dropped Boo Radley home and when she stood on Boo Radley's porch she saw Maycomb through the eyes of Boo Radley. She finally understood why Atticus would always tell her to climb into someones shoes and see the world through their eyes.

k
kcsnowden8
Jul 18, 2012

In this story, the life of a young girl is interrupted with the trial and sentencing of a black man who her father has chosen to defend. It paints a vivid portrait of life in the south, justice, and innocence.

EPLPicks_Teen Apr 07, 2010

Scout's father defends a black man accused of raping a white woman in a small Alabama town during the 1930s.

FavouriteFiction Oct 06, 2009

In the 1930's, a southern lawyer defends a black man wrongly accused of rape.

Explore Further

Browse by Call Number

Recommendations

Subject Headings

  Loading...

Find it at DCPL

  Loading...
[]
[]
To Top